Social Science

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Social Science

CAHSI has established the Social Science Network, a network of social scientists who are interested in recruitment, retention, and advancement of Hispanic students and faculty in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) in general and computing and information science and engineering (CISE) in particular. The purpose of the Social Science Network is to enhance the understanding of CAHSI as to the causes and issues related to Hispanics entering, persisting and progressing in computing. The SSN is to contribute to CAHSI by stimulating or conducting new research to better understand underlying issues in the CAHSI effort, refining interventions, and devising new ones.

If you have interest in contributing to the Social Science Network, please contact CAHSI at: cahsi@utep.edu. For the latest CAHSI evaluation report, please go to "About > Reports"

Social Science Network Models

Social Science Network Models
Research and program evaluation models provide a broader understanding to issues being investigated or the institutional practices, policies or programs being evaluated. This understanding is necessary to grapple with the complexity of the problem of Hispanic recruitment, retention and advancement in computing or STEM in general. Such models may be helpful in estimating the replicability of a program or practice for its adoption or adaptation at another institution. They may also be helpful in revising and the continual improvement of a program, department or institution, or in devising entirely new and innovative programs, practices or policies. They are also helpful in increasing our overall understanding and provide suggestions for future research.
Two NSF programs that have been generally regarded as quite successful are the Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation (LSAMP) and the Model Institutions for Excellence (MIE). These programs have been extensively studied, and the Social Science Network provides brief introductions for CAHSI members and the general computer science, STEM, and HSI community.
The theoretical understanding of student retention has proven to be complex and research has shown that ethnicity, or being Hispanic and the conditions of their situation, can influence the nature of student retention. Amaury Nora and colleagues have investigated the issues and has strongly influenced the field. A white paper on some of these issues is provided here
Advancing Hispanics to the doctorate to become part of the next generation of the professoriate is a major concern for CAHSI and the NSF. To end the underrepresentation of Hispanics in computing and other STEM fields there is a strong need for faculty role models for Hispanic students. Becoming a faculty member at the level of concern for CAHSI starts at the undergraduate level. HSIs consistently produce 33% of STEM baccalaureates and are well represented on the Top 50 baccalaureate origins of STEM Ph.Ds. The Social Science Network provides a brief introduction to an investigation of exemplary practices at the HSI baccalaureates origins of future STEM doctorates in this paper.

Statistics

Statistics

National Science Foundation (NSF):

5 facts about Latinos and Education

  • “Educational attainment among U.S. Latinos has been changing rapidly in recent years, reflecting the group’s growth in the nation’s public K-12 schools and colleges. Over the past decade, the Hispanic high school dropout rate has declined and college enrollment has increased, even as Hispanics trail other groups in earning a bachelor’s degree. Hispanics cited education as a top issue in 2014, ranking alongside the economy and above health care and immigration in importance, a Pew Research Center survey found. Economic factors remain an obstacle for enrollment, however. In a 2014 National Journal poll, 66% of Hispanics who got a job or entered the military directly after high school cited the need to help support their family as a reason for not enrolling in college, compared with 39% of whites.” Krogstad, J.M. (May 2015). 5 facts about Latinos and Education. PewResearchCenter. Retrieved from: http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2015/05/26/5-facts-about-latinos-an...

Among recent high school grads, Hispanic college enrollment rate surpasses that of whites

  • “A new U.S. Census Bureau report shows that after several years of gains, college enrollments in the U.S. fell between 2011 and 2012. But for one group—Hispanics—college enrollments were up, reflecting Hispanic population growth along with a growing share of young Latinos prepared for college. The new Census Bureau data also shows Hispanic students reached other milestones in 2012, continuing recent upward trends in educational attainment and college attendance.” Lopez, M.H., Fry, R. (September 2013) Among recent high school grads, Hispanic college enrollment rate surpasses that of whites. PewResearchCenter. Retrieved from: http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2013/09/04/hispanic-college-enrollm...

Expanding the Pipeline: Hispanic Momentum in Computing

  • “Hispanics have the highest growth rates among all groups in the United States, yet they remain considerably underrepresented in computing careers and in the numbers who obtain advanced degrees. Hispanics comprise only 13 percent of undergraduate students in all fields. Additionally, only seven percent of baccalaureates and less than one percent of doctorates in computer science in 2011 were granted to Hispanic U.S. citizens (National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), 2011). With computing careers growing at a faster than average rate in the United States (BLS, 2010) and internationally (Cervantes, 2003), it’s important to increase the number of Hispanics who complete computing programs and who are qualified to obtain high-status, lucrative positions. The underrepresentation in computing, as well as science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM), can be attributed to the small number of Hispanic faculty, combined with the lack of Hispanic role models and mentors. In 2004, seven Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs) formed the Computing Alliance of Hispanic-Serving Institutions (CAHSI) to consolidate their strengths, resources, and concerns with the aim of increasing the number of Hispanics who pursue and complete baccalaureate and advanced degrees in computing areas (Gates et al. 2011).” Gates, A., Hug, S., Thiry, H. (April 2013). Expanding the Pipeline: Hispanic Momentum in Computing. Computing Research Association, Vol 25/No. 4. Retrieved from: http://cra.org/resources/crn-archive-view-detail/expanding_the_pipeline_...

Computing Research Association (CRA):

  • CRA Taulbee Survey
    The Taulbee Survey is the principal source of information on the enrollment, production, and employment of Ph.D.s in computer science and computer engineering (CS & CE) and in providing salary and demographic data for faculty in CS & CE in North America. Statistics given include gender and ethnicity breakdowns ... [more]

American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE):

  • Engineering by the Numbers (2008)
    This report by the ASEE contains statistics for engineering enrollment and degrees from 1999-2008 for bachelor, master, and post-doctorate students. Summary by Michael Gibbons, director of data research for ASEE.
    Michael Gibbons, director of data research for American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE), "Engineering by the Numbers", 2009. Retrieved from: http://www.asee.org/publications/profiles/index.cfm.

Hispanic Students: 2010 Statistical Survey:

  • A report from the U.S. Census Bureau, Educational Attainment in the United States: 2009,reveals that just 13 percent of Hispanics over the age of 25 hold a bachelor's degree or higher, compared with 53 percent of Asian-Americans, 33 percent of Whites and 19 percent of African-Americans. This represents an increase of one-half of a percent in B.A. attainment for Hispanics since 2007. Melissa Campbell, Hispanic Outlook (Jan 2011). Retrieved from: https://www.wdhstore.com/hispanic/data/pdf/jan3-hipanicstudents.pdf

New Image for Computing (NIC):

  • New Image for Computing - Report on Market Research (April 2009)
    This report covers the first phase of the NIC initiative: market research and initial message testing, which was developed and implemented by Manhattan-based marketing and communications firms, BBMG and Global Strategy Group. In late 2008, NIC conducted a national online survey of college-bound high school students, ages 13–17, whose overall gender and ethnic representation mirrors that of all incoming U.S. freshmen.
    WGBH Educational Foundation and the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), "New Image for Computing Report on Market Research (April 2009)", Apr 2009, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 7 May 2009. Retrieved from: http://www.acm.org/membership/NIC.pdf.

Pew Hispanic Center:

U.S. Census:

  • Facts for Features: Hispanic Heritage Month 2008: Sept. 15 -Oct. 15
  • Hispanics in the United States
    A presentation that highlights past, present and future trends of the Hispanic population.
    Owens, Anna M., "Hispanics in the United States", 2006, Ethnicity and Ancestry Branch Population Division - U.S. Census Bureau, Mar 2008. Retrieved from: http://www.census.gov/population/www/socdemo/hispanic/files/Internet_His...
  • Facts on the Hispanic or Latino Population
  • Hispanic Population of the United States

Other:

Literature on Hispanics

Literature on Hispanics

The Asset Value of Whiteness: Understanding the Racial Wealth Gap

Issues of racial inequity are increasingly at the forefront of America’s public debate. In addition to urgent concerns about racial bias in law enforcement and the criminal justice system, activists highlight deeply connected issues of economic exclusion and inequality. No metric more powerfully captures the persistence and growth of economic inequality along racial and ethnic lines than the racial wealth gap.

Amy Traub, Laura Sullivan, Tatjana Meschede, & Tom Shapiro

Available at: http://cahsi.cs.utep.edu/cahsifiles/Files/ssnlh/Asset_Value_of_Whiteness...

Read the article here: http://www.demos.org/publication/asset-value-whiteness-understanding-rac...

Finding Your Workforce: Latinos in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM)

Finding Your Workforce: Latinos in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) identifies the top institutions graduating Latinos in STEM disciplines for 2012-13, and spotlights replicable practices and efforts at select colleges and universities. This brief provides a snapshot of Latinas in STEM, as well as strategies for successful STEM pathways to increase access and interest in these fields. It offers opportunities for action to improve Latino retention and degree completion and increase representation in the STEM workforce. The brief is part of Excelencia’s efforts to inform recruiters and employers of institutions graduating Latinos in key sectors and encourages them to do more to engage Latinos in their workforce.

Deborah A. Santiago, Morgan Taylor, Emily Calderón Galdeano.

Available at: http://www.edexcelencia.org/research/workforce/stem?utm_source=Excelenci...

Hispanic-Serving Institutions – Advancing Research and Transformative Practice

“Despite the increasing numbers of Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs) and their importance in serving students who have historically been underserved in higher education, limited research has addressed the meaning of the growth of these institutions and its implications for higher education. Hispanic-Serving Institutions fills a critical gap in understanding the organizational behavior of institutions that serve large numbers of low-income, first-generation, and Latina/o students. Leading scholars on HSIs contribute chapters to this volume, exploring a wide array of topics, data sources, conceptual frameworks, and methodologies to examine HSIs’ institutional environments and organizational behavior. This cutting-edge volume explores how institutions can better serve their students and illustrates HSIs’ changing organizational dynamics, potentials, and contributions to American higher education.”

Nunez, A., Hurtado, S., and Calderon E. (2015). Hispanic-Serving Institutions – Advancing Research and Transformative Practice. New York: Routledge.

Available at: http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9781138814318/

¡Excelencia! In Education: The Condition of Latinos in Education 2015 Factbook

¡Excelencia! In Education is committed to using data to inform public policy and institutional practice to achieve our mission of accelerating student success for Latinos in higher education. We know college success does not begin at the college gates. Every educational experience from early childhood to high school and into the workforce influences the potential for college success. For this reason, this publication looks critically at the entire educational pipeline and the context in which our students are learning in order to better understand and inform decision makers about the multiple paths to success for Latino, and all, students.

These fact sheets provide reference tools for today’s diverse stakeholders and can be used to inform data-driven discussions about their efforts to improve Latino educational achievement. The release of “The Condition of Latinos in Education: 2015 Factbook” continues our commitment to provide baseline information on Latino educational progress and to recognize the practices, policies and partnerships with evidence of effectiveness in serving Latino students.

Available at: http://www.edexcelencia.org/research/2015-factbook?utm_source=Excelencia...

The Family Engagement for High School Success Toolkit: Planning and implementing an
initiative to support the pathway to graduation for at-risk students

The Family Engagement for High School Success Toolkit: Planning and implementing an initiative to support the pathway to graduation for at-risk students, highlights the lessons learned from a planning process that tasked 15 local United Way “pilot sites” with bringing together schools, community organizations, families, and other stakeholders to a develop a comprehensive family engagement initiative. With support from the UWW and HFRP, these pilot sites adopted outcome-focused approaches with the aim of designing family engagement strategies to remove obstacles to engagement, and, ultimately, build stronger connections between families and schools. From this careful planning process the pilot sites and their partners in the community developed implementation plans with strong potential for success.

Available at: http://cahsi.utep.edu/cahsifiles/Files/ssnlh/FEHSToolkit.pdf

Study: Women Aren’t Becoming Engineers Because of Confidence Issues

Women are less likely than men to stay in engineering majors and to become engineers because they want to have families and are more insecure about their math abilities, right? Not necessarily, suggests a new study in the October issue of the American Sociological Review.

Available at: http://cacm.acm.org/careers/138412-women-arent-becoming-engineers-becaus...

Making the Most of Professional Conferences

The somewhat tired, but still quite true, “It’s not who you know, but who knows you” maxim is something to keep in mind as the professional conference season starts to heat up. Do you have plans to attend a meeting this year? Will you be strategic about how you spend your energy when you are there? How will you use the time to strengthen your professional reputation and position yourself for new opportunities? Here are a few tips to consider.

Available at: http://chronicle.com/blogs/onhiring/making-the-most-of-professional-conf...

Women in STEM: A Gender Gap to Innovation

Our science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) workforce is crucial to America’s innovative capacity and global competitiveness. Yet women are vastly underrepresented in STEM jobs and among STEM degree holders despite making up nearly half of the U.S. workforce and half of the college-educated workforce. That leaves an untapped opportunity to expand STEM employment in the United States, even as there is wide agreement that the nation must do more to improve its competitiveness.

  • Although women fill close to half of all jobs in the U.S. economy, they hold less than 25 percent of STEM jobs. This has been the case throughout the past decade, even as college-educated women have increased their share of the overall workforce.
  • Women with STEM jobs earned 33 percent more than comparable women in non-STEM jobs – considerably higher than the STEM premium for men. As a result, the gender wage gap is smaller in STEM jobs than in non-STEM jobs.
  • Women hold a disproportionately low share of STEM undergraduate degrees, particularly in engineering.
  • Women with a STEM degree are less likely than their male counterparts to work in a STEM occupation; they are more likely to work in education or healthcare.

There are many possible factors contributing to the discrepancy of women and men in STEM jobs, including: a lack of female role models, gender stereotyping, and less family-friendly flexibility in the STEM fields. Regardless of the causes, the findings of this report provide evidence of a need to encourage and support women in STEM.

Available at: http://cahsi.utep.edu/cahsifiles/Files/ssnlh/WomenInSTEMAGenderGartoInno...

Education Policy and Practice Perspectives

As Hispanic-serving institutions (HSIs) grow in numbers, it is important to address how these two- and four-year colleges and universities can truly be Hispanic-serving institutions, as opposed to simply being considered Hispanic-enrolling institutions. This policy brief represents a collaborative effort involving the American Association of Hispanics in Higher Education (AAHHE), the Educational Testing Service (ETS), the University of Southern California Center for Urban Education (CUE), and the Departments of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies at Iowa State University and the University of Texas at San Antonio. The goals of this brief are to aid HSIs in: (1) attending to their mission and identity in order to develop programmatic initiatives that promote Latina/o student success, and (2) focusing on collecting data to assess the extent HSIs are meeting their mission to improve educational outcomes for Latino students. Malcom, E., Mara B.E., Dávila, B., 2010. (Re)Constructing Hispanic-Serving Institutions:Moving Beyond Numbers Toward Student Success. Retrieved December 2010.

Available at: http://cue.usc.edu/news/CUE%20policy%20brief_Malcom_Bensimon_Davila_Reco...

In the STEM Fields, How Hispanic Students Pay for Their Education Affects Success

This report examines the most commonly used forms of financial aid and college financing strategies among Latino STEM bachelor's degree holders. Given the large number of Latinos enrolled in community colleges and at Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs), the report examines the financing strategies of those students who earned associate's degrees and attended HSIs in comparison with those who did not. Malcom, L., Dowd A., Yu, T. IBM, 2010. Tapping HSI-STEM Funds to Improve Latina and Latino Access to STEM Professions. (Center for Urban Education) . Retrieved December 2010.

Available at: http://cue.usc.edu/media/NSF STEM report 3 Tapping HSI-STEM Funds to Improve Latina and Latino Access to STEM Professions.pdf

The Higher Education Research Institute (HERI)

The Higher Education Research Institute (HERI) serves as an interdisciplinary center for research, evaluation, information, policy studies, and research training in postsecondary education. HERI is housed in the Graduate School of Education & Information Studies (GSE&IS)at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). The Institute's research program covers a variety of topics including the outcomes of postsecondary education, leadership development, institutional transformation, faculty performance, federal and state policy, and educational equity. Visiting scholars, faculty, and graduate students have made use of HERI facilities and its research resources since its affiliation with UCLA in 1973. HERI Research programs related to CAHSI include:

  • Diverse Learning Environments
  • Post- Baccalaureate Experiences,

Hispanicity and Educational Inequality: Risks, Opportunities and the Nation's Future

The 2009 Tomás Rivera Lecture explores the opportunities and challenges provided by the rapidly growing school-age Hispanic population in the United States. It describes how despite educational progress, the Hispanic achievement gap persists. This report documents Hispanic demographics, growth trends, educational attainment and road blocks leading to Hispanic underrepresentation in higher education.

Tienda, Marta. 2009. Hispanicity and Educational Inequality: Risks, Opportunities and the Nation's Future. Princeton, NJ: Educational Testing Service.

Available at: http://www.ets.org

Taking Successful Programs to Scale and Creating Lasting Results - National Math and Science Initiative

This paper presents a model and guide for scaling effective programs that promotes planned withdrawal of support and leads to a self-sufficient program. The model is based on the belief that "public services such as education should be funded primarily by public funds, but that public/private partnerships can create the impetus to maximize effective programs.

National Science and Math Initiative, Taking Successful Programs to Scale and Creating Lasting Results.

Available at: http://www.nationalmathandscience.org

Out Before the Game Begins - 2008 Public Agenda Report, IBM

Public Agenda s interviewed Hispanic scientists and inventors, officers at technology corporations, leaders from prominent non-profit and corporate entities, as well as government and educational institutions, about what's needed to bring more Hispanic youngsters into science, technology and math professions. This report summarizes the themes that emerged.

Public Agenda Report, IBM, Out Before The Game Begins: Hispanic Leaders Talk about What's Needed to Bring More Hispanic Youngsters Into Science, Technology and Math Professions. (Palisades, NY May 2008).

Available at: http://www.ibm.com/ibm/ibmgives/reports/index.shtml

Beyond the Glass Ceiling : A Special Report

Women and under-represented minorities are earning historically high numbers of science doctorates in the United States, but they are having problems making it to the professorial ranks. While this report looks at science, the article makes numerous points that are applicable to engineering, e.g., implicit bias and challenges one faces going into academe.

T. Horowitz/Corbis. Beyond the Glass Ceiling, A Special Report. Nature Publishing, Volume 448, July 5, 2007.

Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Directory of Schools, Programs, and Scholarships - Tomás Rivera Institute

The directory serves as a resource for Latino students and professionals who seek opportunities in STEM professional fields. The Schools section includes both public and nonpublic schools across the nation that specialize in STEM curricula. The Programs section presents opportunities such as conferences, workshops, and internships in the various fields, for all age ranges. The Scholarships section contains scholarship information for high school, college undergraduates, and graduate students interested in STEM fields. The directory is also accessible online at www.trpi.org.

Maria Teresa V. Taningco, Ph.D., David Estrada, MPP Candidate, IBM. "Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Directory of Schools, Programs, and Scholarships", Prepared by The Tomás Rivera Policy Institute for IBM.(Claremont, CA February 2002).

Available at: http://www.ibm.com/ibm/ibmgives/reports/index.shtml

America's Competitiveness: Hispanic Participation in Technology Careers Summit Report - IBM, ExxonMobil, Lockheed Martin and Univision 2008

The summit "America's Competitiveness: Hispanic Participation in Technology Careers" brought together leaders from business, education, government, and community organizations to develop an action plan to increase the number of Hispanic students pursuing and entering careers in STEM fields in the United States. This report presents the strategic plans that emerged. Recommendations and action plans were defined in the four main sectors spotlighted at the summit: education, students and families, non-profits/non-governmental organizations, and corporations. Media emerged as an important area of focus during the conference.

Maria Teresa V. Taningco, Ph.D., David Estrada, MPP Candidate, IBM. Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Directory of Schools, Programs, and Scholarships, Prepared by The Tomás Rivera Policy Institute for IBM. (Claremont, CA February 2002).

Available at: http://www.ibm.com/ibm/ibmgives/reports/index.shtml

A Matter of Trust - 2008 Public Agenda Report, IBM

This report presents ten key insights from in-depth opinion surveys on attitudes about education among Hispanic parents, students and young adults. The surveys examines how Hispanic parents rate their local schools, what problems they identify, what kinds of goals they have for the education of their children and what challenges they see ahead.

Public Agenda Report, IBM. A Matter of Trust: Hispanic Leaders Talk about What's Needed to Bring More Hispanic Youngsters Into Science, Technology and Math Professions. (Palisades, NY May 2008).

Available at http://www.ibm.com/ibm/ibmgives/reports/index.shtml

An Investigation of Computational Holistic Evaluation of Admissions Applications for a Minority Focused STEM Research Program

Abstract: Most recently, many higher education institutions have continued to struggle to answer the question of whether they should promote diversity as a central value of the university or protect themselves from legal challenge by avoiding the inclusion of diversity initiatives. In this article, the authors first provide several examples documenting how U.S. colleges and universities struggle with this question. Second, the authors provide a viable solution to promote diversity at the university that is within all legal parameters of recent court decisions. Third, a case study example citing how diversity can be achieved using holistic evaluation is provided. Finally, recommendations are provided for all relevant stakeholders who want to promote diversity at the university level without facing legal challenge.

Juan E. Gilbert, Auburn University, Chance W. Lewis., Texas A&M University. An Investigation of Computational Holistic Evaluation of Admissions Applications for a Minority Focused STEM Research Program. Journal of STEM Education Volume 9, Issue 1 & 2 January-May 2008.

Latinos in STEM Professions: Understanding Challenges and Opportunities for Next Steps – A Qualitative Study using Stakeholder Interviews

This study reports on interviews with key stakeholders who describe barriers and challenges and recommend effective strategies to increase Latino participation in the professions of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). In particular, the report describes the importance of mentoring, teacher preparation, and parental support.

Maria Teresa V. Taningco, IBM. Latinos in STEM Professions: Understanding Challenges and Opportunities for Next Steps: A Qualitative Study using Stakeholder Interviews , Prepared by The Tomás Rivera Policy Institute for IBM. (Claremont, CA April 2008).

Available at: http://www.ibm.com/ibm/ibmgives/reports/index.shtml

Latinos and Information Technology: The Promise and the Challenge

The findings of this report are organized into three broad and interrelated topics. The first refers to issues of access to Information Technology in Latino communities, including the basic understanding that access is a quality-of-use issue, rather than counting numbers of computers per capita. The second section refers to learning technologies across the educational spectrum, while the third section addresses IT workforce issues, including the implications of educational attainment and achievement.

Tornatzky, Louis, et all, IBM. Latinos and Information Technology: The Promise and the Challenge, Prepared by The Tomás Rivera Policy Institute for the IBM Hispanic Digital Divide Task Force. (Los Angeles, CA April 2008)

Computer Use, Parental Expectations Latino Academic Achievement

This report presents a quantitative study that examines the factors responsible for Hispanic or Latino student achievement relative to that of comparison groups. The Tomás Rivera Policy Institute (TRPI) examines the impact on reading and writing, math and science achievement levels of computer use both at school and at home, and of teacher preparation for computer-based instruction.

Maria Teresa V. Taningco, Ann Bessie Mathew, and Harry P. Pachon, IBM. Computer Use, Parental Expectations Latino Academic Achievement, Prepared by The Tomás Rivera Policy Institute for IBM. (Claremont, CA February 2002).

Available at: http://www.ibm.com/ibm/ibmgives/reports/index.shtml

In Pursuit of a Diverse Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Workforce: Recommended Research Priorities to Enhance Participation by Under-Represented Minorities

The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and the National Science Foundation Directorate for Education and Human Resources Programs presents the results of a study group meeting in September 2000 of 70 leading educators and researchers in the STEM fields. AAAS examined over 150 research efforts related to choice of college majors, retention in STEM college majors, academic mentoring at both the pre-college and higher education levels, and pursuit of a STEM doctorate and faculty positions. The report presents key research, identified gaps, and a research agenda for broadening participation in STEM fields.

Yolanda S. George, David S. Neale, Virginia Van Horne, and Shirley M. Malcom, American Association for the Advancement of Science and NSF Directorate for Education and Human Resources Programs. In Pursuit of a Diverse Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Workforce: Recommended Research Priorities to Enhance Participation by Underrepresented Minorities. (Washington, DC December 2001)

STEM Professions: Opportunities and Challenges for Latinos in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics – A Review of Literature

This report presents existing literature regarding Latino participation in STEM-related fields. It describes trends in degree attainment and employment levels for these fields, and describes various obstacles and opportunities that impact Latino representation.

Maria Teresa V. Taningco, Ann Bessie Mathew, and Harry P. Pachon, IBM. STEM Professions: Opportunities and Challenges for Latinos in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics – A Review of Literature, Prepared by The Tomás Rivera Policy Institute for IBM. (Claremont, CA April 2008). Available at: http://www.ibm.com/ibm/ibmgives/reports/index.shtml

Wanted: More Hispanics in STEM fields: New initiatives aim to inspire Latinos to pursue science and technology careers

In what is becoming a national trend, leading businesses and education groups are launching new initiatives aimed at increasing the number of minorities--and Hispanics in particular--in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields.

Laura Devaney, Senior Editor, eSchool News. Wanted: More Hispanics in STEM fields, New initiatives aim to inspire Latinos to pursue science and technology careers.2008.

Available at: http://www.eschoolnews.com/news/top-news/news-by-subject/curriculum/inde...

Report of the Academic Competitiveness Council

This 87 page report from the American Competiveness Council summarizes one year of work to assess successes among different government organizations' efforts to improve STEM education in the U.S. The report gives specific recommendations which can be useful to aggregate some similar efforts together. Statistics on many efforts are included within the report.

U.S. Department of Education, "Report of the Academic Competitiveness Council", (Washington, D.C., 2007).

Society of Women Engineers General Position Statement on Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Education and the Need for a U.S. Technologically-Literate Workforce

This document is an educational position statement of the Society of Women Engineers calling for a renewed focus on training and recruiting the future's technological workforce, especially women and ethnic minorities (Latinos, African Americans). Includes recommendations for improving STEM education, expanding the STEM pipeline to include underrepresented groups, and making the U.S. attractive to researchers and students, both nationally and internationally.

Society of Women Engineers, "General Position Statement on Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Education and the Need for a U.S. Technologically-Literate Workforce." SWA. February 2006.

Available at: http://societyofwomenengineers.swe.or